Brown is the new black!

This year I’m turning 46 – wow where did the time go! Janine FringeI was born with a head of beautiful dark, almost black hair (and I’ll tell you a secret, my mum used to have to use Vaseline to stick it down as I had so much hair it used to stick up all the time!! hahaha). In my 20s I sported a fringe, and then in my early 30’s just after my son was born, I decided it was time for a change and I grew out my fringe and haven’t looked back. However, as I neared 20 I suddenly realised that I had developed grey hair – not just a few odd grey strands here and there, but grey roots – lots of them!

By the time I was 25 I was 100% grey! Needless to say I have spent a lot of money and effort dyeing my hair. In fact, I’m a bit of an expert at it. The cost of hairdressing appointments and the fact that my hair grows fast – really fast – necessitating retouching up my roots at least every 3 weeks, adds up fast. My bathroom cupboard is filled with the stained towels and bottles of magic that keep my hair looking slick.

I can’t tell you the amount of hours I’ve spent stressing about my grey roots, and the imaginative ways I’ve managed to hide them over the years. One thing won’t change however, and that is unless I’m prepared to be 100% grey, I will need to continue to colour my hair. I’ve decided I’m just not ready for that yet.

One of the negatives of hair colouring, especially when only retouching the roots, is that no matter how very careful and expert you become, there is always an overlap of colour and over time this builds up and darkens the hair.

I’ve always tried to stay as close to my natural colour as possible (and for the record my eyebrows are still natural! albeit with a few wisps of grey I have to pluck out now and again!) – but recently I’ve been toying with the idea of what to do.  I spoke to my hairdresser and she advised a couple of options:

  1. Cut it all off and grow it out grey
  2. Start colouring the roots a shade or two lighter and begin foiling sections of my hair over time until it lightens up; or
  3. Continue as is

None of these ideas felt right to me and I asked her about stripping my hair and recolouring?  She was not keen, and advised against it.  I’ve pondered and pondered and felt stuck. It was time for a change, but how?

Recently we moved house. I decided that this was a good time to get another opinion and check out a new hairdresser, so I bit the bullet and called my local salon.  I explained over the phone the situation and made an appointment for the next day.

This is what my hair looked like just before I walked into the salon 🙁

Hair 2

Upon entering the salon I was greeted warmly and ushered to a seat where I was served a lovely cup of coffee.  Minutes later Kayla, my colourist came to greet me and sat down to discuss what I was wanting to achieve. Within minutes she had taken stock of the situation and called her colleague Emily, also a colour expert to join in and together they worked through my thoughts and hopes with me. What struck me immediately was their instant willingness to go for it!  They were super excited at the challenge and after a quote was given and I’d been advised that I’d be there for at least 4 hours, the process started!

With two gorgeous ladies with the most capable skills attending to the challenge, I settled in patiently and surrendered to the process.

Hair 4 Hair 7

This was immediately after the colour had been stripped from my hair! Oh boy what a shock, I felt like an orangutan! The looks I got from those who hadn’t seen the beginning or the end of the process was priceless.

BUT it was all worth it, the final result was all I could have hoped for. Immediately my features were softened and I felt so much better.

Hair 10Hair 17

A huge thanks to the team at Rokk Ebony, you guys rock! I’m so thrilled with my new colour and feeling confident and ready for anything. Sometimes self-confidence needs some help!

Love your shape!

Janine x

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *